Published on:

It may sound harsh to some, but if those people protesting about income inequality, would put their mind, body and soul into learning what needs to be learned to get a job in the tech world, they would discover first hand how America was built. Many an American fortune was made by a person focusing all their energy on bettering themselves. One of the big divides in America is between those marching to make the world a better place and those working to feed their family, bet a bigger and better place to live and make the money to school their kids. The world is a cold and nasty place, unfair and unkind, and that is never going to change, but what can change is how you live your life to fend off all the horror that and sadness that is right outside your door.

Published on:

Before you renovate, look at new FEMA rules
Hoboken homeowners and home buyers face new challenges when considering extensive renovations because of recent changes in Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) regulations.
FEMA now forces homeowners who make improvements that raise the value of a property by more than 50 percent to conform to new base flood elevation rules. Under this directive, ground-level and basement dwellings that fall within revised FEMA flood areas must be elevated above the flood level or owners will lose the use of these spaces and utilities must be relocated. Revised FEMA flood maps place 79 percent of Hoboken in a flood zone and the city’s entire Hudson River coastline is now within FEMA’s “coastal high hazard” zone.
FEMA says it implemented the new guidelines because flooding during Super Storm Sandy far exceeded existing base flood elevations; by as much as several feet in some areas. Hoboken was once an island with tidal lands to the west. A heavy rainfall that coincides with a high tide of the Hudson River impedes water draining into the river, resulting in extensive street flooding. A flood pump on Observer Highway completed in 2012 improves expelling water into the river, but it has not fully solved flooding problems in Southwest Hoboken. A second flood pump is planned for Northwest Hoboken.
City officials argue that it is not feasible for building owners to raise attached multi-story buildings to comply with the requirements. They also say some elevators would not be able to stop below the second floor, necessitating elaborate and expensive handicapped ramps. The rules adversely impact the utilization of street-level spaces in the flood hazard areas, and harm street life and community character, the city says.
For certain, the regulations will severely impact home sales and renovations as well as some home values in Hoboken’s dense urban neighborhoods. There are also numbers legal implications that homeowners and home buyers must consider when properties are located in flood areas.

Published on:

Few things symbolize the American dream like owning a business. But delving into the world of entrepreneurship can be scary and tricky without the right planning and advice.
There are nearly 28 million small businesses – those with fewer than 500 employees – in the United States. Well over three quarters are run by individuals with no additional payroll or employees and more than half are home-based.
Many ordinary citizens, including residents of Hoboken and Hudson County, are going to work for themselves. Often it’s to realize a long-held dream. But many are displaced workers investing money from buyouts, settlements and severance after being unable to find a new job. This is especially true for older workers. More than five million Americans age 55 and older are either in business for themselves or otherwise self-employed, and the number is rising, according to the Small Business Administration.
One reason may be that while older workers are less likely than younger counterparts to be laid off, they are about a fifth less likely than those in the 25 to 34 age range to find a new job if they are. A study by AARP published in March says that on average, 45 percent of jobseekers over age 55 were considered long-term unemployed last year, meaning they were out of work for 27 weeks or more.
Starting a business can help you remain focused and productive, learn new skills, explain an employment gap on your resume and earn much-needed money as you look for a new job. It can also become your next career. But you’ll need more than a good idea. Be realistic about what’s involved and make sure you’re up to the task.
There are many legal issues to consider, ranging from the name of your business to its structure and operation. You’ll also want to make sure that suppliers and potential clients don’t co-opt your products, processes, ideas and strategies for their use. Your attorney will help protect you in these areas. If you’re stuck trying to figure out how to make the leap from employee to owner and make it all fit into your life, working with a professional development and business coach like Robert Naylor of Jersey City (http://www.naylorcoaching.com) can help you sort some things out.

Published on:

With a median household income twice the national average and nearly three quarters of its population holding college degrees, Hoboken is known as an affluent community. But few people are aware of it diversity. Nearly 15 percent of Hoboken’s population was born outside the United States and a fifth speak a language other than English at home. Nearly 17 percent of its businesses are minority owned.
More than that, Hoboken reflects the sociocultural changes occurring around the country, in which racial and ethnic identity are becoming more difficult to define, and where we are forced to see people as people. Although racial classifications continue to be a part of the nation’s social structure, perceptions of racial identity are becoming increasingly less defined.
Beginning in 2000, the federal government allowed Americans to choose more than one racial category for the census count. When responding to the 2010 census, millions of people changed their racial identity from what they had selected 10 years earlier. Researchers who examined the results found no hard evidence to explain the change, but they surmised that evolving self-identity might have accounted for many of the changes. Remember Rachel Dolezal, the Caucasian woman in Spokane, Wash., who drew national attention for pretending to be African American? The fact that she could mislead so many people for so long shows how complicated race is in 21st century America.
Increasing ethnic and racial diversity resulting from record immigration and increasing rates of interracial marriages makes demographics more complicated. Children adopted by parents from ethnic backgrounds different theirs can struggle to reconcile how are seen by others outside their families with the world in which they grow up.
Race can make a great deal of difference in our daily encounters or it can make none, which despite all its complications shows race to more a social construct than physical trait. So what purpose does checking that checkbox make? Is it to perpetuate stereotypes, or to create division when none exist.

Published on:

The Supreme Courts June 26 decision permitting same-sex marriages nationwide will likely mean an early flurry of couples tying the knot after having waited many years for the chance.
But it might be a good idea for some couples to put the ceremonies and celebrations on hold long enough to get their financial affairs in order. I’m not trying to put a damper on the idea of a lifetime of wedded bliss. However, along with a range of new benefits, rights and protections previously afforded only to heterosexual couples, the ruling also means new responsibilities and obligations.
I have been helping lesbian and gay couples in Hoboken and Hudson County manage their legal and financial affairs since New Jersey adopted same-sex marriage nearly two years ago, and in the preceding years under civil unions. Before that I helped couples navigate the maze of existing laws to secure assets and protect their relationships. But nationwide marriage creates special circumstances.
Some researchers suggest that LGBT communal structures create fewer barriers to social interaction between people with sizeable income and family wealth disparities. So it’s not unusual for romance to blossom into love long before information about differences in personal wealth, economic backgrounds and family inheritances is fully discussed.
Couples can find the thought of a prenuptial agreement disconcerting and fear that conversations will sap the romance out of their relationship. Some individuals can view the mere suggestion as a lack of trust. But a prenuptial agreement is not simply about dissolution of a marriage; it is a key financial planning tool that generates conversations about how money, assets and financial obligations are dealt with over time. This is especially important in relationships where the lines between traditional roles are either blurred or nonexistent.
A prenuptial agreement allows couples to settle financial issues up front so they can focus on building their family and living happily ever after.

Published on:

The heated rhetoric around the Supreme Court’s June 26 decision allowing same-sex marriages in all 50 states is showing no signs of cooling off. Reactions to the court’s 5-4 decision range from clever analyses to officials in some states declaring they will not honor the ruling.
Same-sex couples in Hoboken and Hudson County have had the right to marry for nearly two years, and for six years before that had civil unions under New Jersey law.
While Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote for the majority that the history of marriage is “one of both continuity and change,” the dissenters clung to what they termed a more “traditional” view of marriage. Only Justice Clarence Thomas specifically mentioned God. But the justices voting in the minority seemed to cling to a Judeo-Christian view of marriage as a religious institution.
To have said so would have crossed the line between separation of church and state. But it is clear that the dissenting justices – all devout Catholics – were greatly influenced by their religious beliefs. Thomas, a former seminarian, took issue with the ideas of “liberty” and “dignity” as stated in the majority opinion, arguing that the primary plaintiffs in the case were not deprived of liberty because they could travel and settle freely without government intervention.
He oddly argued that slaves and those held in internment camps did not lose their dignity either because the government allowed their confinement or held them. It’s an interesting, if nonsensical, argument that ignores the fact that the majority also said same-sex couples were afforded the same Fourteenth Amendment protections as any other couple.
Thomas’ argument that liberty and dignity should be shielded from the government rather than provided by it is also interesting in that based on his rationale the court erred in the landmark 1967 case Loving v. Virginia, which struck down laws banning interracial marriage. Thomas himself is coupled in an interracial marriage and lives in Virginia.

Published on:

 

 

Source: Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase Agree to Erase Debts From Credit Reports After Bankruptcies – NYTimes.com

The two banks have agreed to update borrowers’ reports within the next three months to reflect that the debts were canceled.

Finally some relief to people caught up in the mortgage crisis.  These Banks, who received billions from the Government are finally doing something to help the poor consumer.  By updating credit reports, people can now afford to buy a new home.  Its about time.

Published on:

 

Pink concert didn’t harm N.J. girl, judge says

A new case recently decided by the New Jersey Courts deals with the situation where one divorced  parent disagrees with the other about attending cultural events such as a music concert.  While the artist Pink was the subject of this case, you can see how it could be problem with a Miley Cyrus concert or a Wrestlemania event.

This case presents issues involving divorced parents, an eleven year old girl, and rock music. The parties are in the midst of ongoing contested litigation over physical custody of the child, during which the plaintiff-father contends that the defendant-mother abused her parental discretion and made an age-inappropriate decision by taking their daughter to a rock concert performed by the singer, P!nk, on December 11, 2013 at the Prudential Center 1 Pseudonyms and initials are used in place of the actual names of the parties and child at issue. in Newark, New Jersey. 2 For the reasons set forth in this opinion, the court holds the following:

A) Following divorce, each parent serving as a joint legal custodian generally has a right to exercise reasonable parental discretion over a child’s activities while in his or her physical care, free from unreasonable interference, infringement, obstruction or attempted control by the other parent. B) Each parent has a constitutional right to exercise reasonable parental discretion in introducing and exposing the child to works and performances of the creative arts. C) While divorced parents may disagree on whether a child should or should not be exposed to certain works or performances of the creative arts, the court will generally not interfere with either parent’s freedom of personal discretion on the issue, or hold same as evidence of improper or inferior parenting skills in custody litigation, unless the evidence reflects that the artistic work or performance is so objectively age-inappropriate that no reasonable person could rationally disagree on same. D) Rock music is a valid and highly recognized form of creative artistic expression in the United States and world. E) Defendant’s decision to take the parties’ daughter to the Pink rock concert, during her own parenting time, was a reasonable and appropriate exercise of parental discretion.

Published on:

Dupuy: End the war on deadbeat dads

Interesting article from a women whose father was a deadbeat Dad but who is against putting men who do not pay their child support in Jail.  I have on a few occasions fought  for child support payments from delinquent fathers to the point of getting them in handcuffs in front of the Judge.  But invariably they pay a small amount of support and get out of jail.  On one hand, without threat of jail there is a possibility that a person would not take child support seriously, but on the other hand, what good does it do to put a person in jail for not paying his debts.  Nothing is simple.

 

Published on:

carpet hut now chloe rose fine carpets.JPG

I represent a good amount of business in Hoboken, Liquor Licenses, Bar, Restaurants and a big problem with the sale of Hoboken retail store front business is that the Landlord’s rent scares away many buyers.   Hoboken  stores, outside of food places, have a hard time competing with malls and online sites.   I find it very important in negotiating commercial leases to limit the amount of bank rent the Landlord can recovery when a business goes bad.  A lawyer’s job has got to be limiting financial and legal exposure.

More NJ small businesses for sale for less

photo from Hoboken411.com